Posted on February 19, 2008 · Posted in Brain Injury

This winter of 2008, there have been two well publicized mass shootings in my part time home state of Illinois, and many more mass killings from Carbon Monoxide. Even the election cycle news had to take a pause for the Northern Illinois tragedy. Nary a peep, except in the local media, about Carbon Monoxide’s rampages.
The first string of cases, was so predictable, I almost blame myself for not having found a bigger mountain top to have raised my cry of alarm: household generators. Any time there is a flame, and it is in an unventilated place, there will be a risk of CO exposure. Well the last few weeks has seen many storms. With storms, comes power outages. With power outages, comes the use of portable electric generators. My father spent his life designing such generators. Electric generators, when used properly, should not be a serious risk. But they were never intended to be set up in the kitchen, to operate the microwave.
More severe weather is sweeping across the nation this week. I fear that will be more power outages, more death from this silent killer. If you are in the business of selling portable generators, I believe you must include a CO detector with each purchase. That should be the law. I am sure the good businessmen who sell them warn people, but you can buy the little portable units almost anywhere now, and the corporate executives at Home Depot or Walmart, ought to just package the CO detector right with the product.
For more information on the dangers of portable generators, click here:
Here are the basic rules to avoid CO exposure when using a portable generator:
Always use generators outdoors.
Keep generator exhaust away from air that flows into a building. But also make sure it is away from windows, doore and vents. The venting part can be critical. Many of the tragic stories we have heard this winter was from indirect exposure because an engine source (like a generator) was too close to an air intake vent.
Garages, basements, crawl spaces, are not OUTDOORS.
Follow manufacturer’s instructions. This presumes you can still find the instructions. Hopefully they are printed right on the generator itself. If not, look them up online. Keep in mind that exhaust that can get into your living area can kill you.
Use CO detectors, and make sure they are working, that the batteries are replaced when needed. Remember that smoke detectors, are not CO detectors. You can have CO exposure with no smell of smoke and without a smoke detector going off.

About the Author

Attorney Gordon S. Johnson, Jr.
Past Chair Traumatic Brain Injury Litigation Group, American Association of Justice :: 800-992-9447